solar eclipse

  • solar eclipse

    Posted by Jerry on October 6, 2023 at 6:17 pm

    Hi everyone.

    I heard the other day that there is a solar eclipse on October 14th in the United States that is visible from Oregon to Texas.

    There is something I heard of a few years ago that I’m quite fascinated with. It is said that when there is a solar eclipse, a pendulum underneath experiences an unusual effect, where it “swings all about wildly”. I’ve heard this effect of the “shaky” pendulum is called the Allais effect. However, one main definition calls it an “alleged” effect, which of course suggests there isn’t adequate experimental data available. And a video I watched said it isn’t yet known if the Allais effect is real, or if it the effect is attributed to an experimental error.

    I wish I had known of this effect when a solar eclipse was visible in Nashville a few years ago! It is said that there is a solar eclipse somewhere in the world approximately every 18 months. So eventually I want to travel wherever I can to experiment with them!

    So I had some thoughts and questions of how to test this unusual phenomenon, and a few ideas with which to possibly perform an experiment

    How would a pendulum act through an eclipse if it were set up underneath a lead square? or within a lead box? (I say specifically “lead” since some waves within the electromagnetic spectrum have trouble going through lead. Maybe a different material would work better for this potential experiment.) Would this stop or slow down the wild “swings” of the pendulum? Could you tell if whatever causes the “shaky” effect emanates directly and straightforwardly from the eclipse in the sky, or is it possibly “all around” and maybe detectable (also) through a sideways trajectory, if the lead square covered the pendulum?

    Also, what if it were possible to directly study how this unusual effect works? What if a “network” of small lights or lasers were put into place, while someone sprays an aerosol liquid to possibly show what’s hidden within the invisible field, to detect the course of electromagnetism or gravity that it “follows” to form patterns, sort of similar to the way metal slivers on a piece of paper with a magnet underneath shows the intricate design that the magnetic field generates.

    Is the interference within the vicinity of a pendulum through an eclipse caused by the absence, or instead a surplus, of gravity or electromagnetism? Or they possibly alternate between each of them? Is more gravity propagated by the presence of the moon combined with the sun, or is it less gravity, since the moon is in the way and much of the sun’s gravity doesn’t reach the earth?

    Maybe a heavy lead square or box isn’t even necessary to study the Allais effect. Is it possible that the Allais effect is observable, or even preventable, within a house?

    Anyway, would any scientists or enthusiasts throughout that area have interest in testing this effect? Has this unusual pendulum effect already been experimented with?

    Thanks!

    John-Erik replied 7 months, 1 week ago 2 Members · 11 Replies
  • 11 Replies
  • Jerry

    Member
    October 6, 2023 at 6:22 pm

    Hi. Please read this one. I couldn’t find out how to delete the other two.

    Thanks!

    • John-Erik

      Member
      October 13, 2023 at 7:07 pm

      Jerry

      This phenomenon is explained easily, since gravity contribution from the Sun has to pass through the Moon. The Sun contribution is therefore slightly reduced in parts of our planet of the size of the Moon. However, we cannot detect this reduction, since the effect becomes converted to motion of these parts of our planet a very small distance away from our Sun. So, our planet becomes slightly deformed.

      The very small motion away from the Sun is not exactly the same in a point (pendulum) as in the average value in surrounding Earth. A long pendulum should therefore be able to detect this effect. Best is to use a pendulum at rest.

      Regards from ________________________ John-Erik

      • Jerry

        Member
        October 13, 2023 at 8:29 pm

        Thanks, John-Erik.

        When you mentioned “Sun contribution”, did you mean the Sun’s gravity? So does the Sun and Moon’s gravity each combine with each other to generate more gravity than usually experienced on Earth? or that the Moon “gets in the way” of the Sun, thus creating a reduced degree of gravity, except only within the area the eclipse is visible?

        When you wrote “the effect becomes converted to motion” was this meant as the effect of why the pendulum wobbles? Does the area affected by the eclipse either compress or expand? or something else? This seems sort of similar to length contraction. Where the area undergoes a temporary physical transformation. How was all this discovered? When I looked it up there didn’t seem much documented knowledge about it. Is there a link you could provide? Thanks!

  • John-Erik

    Member
    October 14, 2023 at 6:13 pm

    Jerry

    Yes, I meant Sun’s contribution to gravity. Matter causes gravity by absorbing ether particles, so, manifestation by lack of particles. Reduced flow towards the second body means that the contribution from the second body also is reduced and we get an effect of second order (small) when they become aligned. Less gravity. It is better to use a pendulum at rest.

    No, this is not causing the wobbling. Instead, this reduction should cause parts of Earth to move away from the Sun/Moon system to a very small amount.

    No, I do not know any links either.

    John-Erik

    • Jerry

      Member
      October 15, 2023 at 5:11 pm

      I had the thought that the moon could possibly absorb much of the gravity of the sun, instead of just preventing gravity’s further propagation to the earth. Is this sort of what you meant, except that the ether is also involved?

      Here’s a thought I had as to why a pendulum might “wobble”, when the complete solar eclipse is in effect. If a metal coin, for instance, were placed between the poles of a horseshoe magnet, it doesn’t ever just “stay there”. It is always quickly assigned to one pole or the other. And even if you try to hold the coin perfectly between the magnet poles, you can feel the constant unsteadiness of the coin’s ever-present condition, as it is drawn quickly to one pole or the other. The more you try to keep it in the mid-point position, the more it seems to vary to which pole it is drawn to. </font>

      Is a similar principle possibly at work with the eclipse? The moon is in the way of the sun, and you can actually see the light that exists all around the edge of the eclipse. It creates a sort of “silver lining” around the moon. This bright thin circle is possibly the main source of gravity that the sun propagates that reaches the area of earth with which the complete eclipse is visible. So when the pendulum is present through the eclipse, maybe it can’t quite (figuratively) “decide” which direction to sway?

      • This reply was modified 7 months, 2 weeks ago by  Jerry.
      • John-Erik

        Member
        October 20, 2023 at 10:19 pm

        Jerry

        Yes, I think you are essentially right. In my opinion gravity is caused by matter ABSORBING ether particles. Most scientists seem to assume ether particles instead to be COLLIDING with matter. No aberration in gravity supports my opinion. Yes, a very small effect of second order seems to be caused. But this small effect is not observable on Earth, since this effect is controlling how matter moves. So, a part of our planet about the size of the Moon is therefore moved a very small amount away from the Sun/Moon system. Maybe in the order of 1 meter and disturbing the form of our planet. This explains the ‘wobbling’. Interpretation of this effect is best done of the pendulum is at rest. This interpretation is supported by an important observation some years ago when the largest disturbances were found in the beginning and in the end of the eclipse.

        It is important to see that gravity DEMANDS the ether.

        John-Erik

        • Jerry

          Member
          October 21, 2023 at 10:02 pm

          Thanks, John-Erik.

          It is definitely puzzling to say the least, to consider that the gravity of objects directly affect each other, where there is (as the popular expression goes) “action at a distance”. Where they don’t seem to physically meet at all.

          With the ether though, does it get more dense (more particles at close proximity), when in the presence of objects (particularly large ones, such as stars and planets)? And does the ether (or the particles which compose it) get very “sparsely scattered” in outer space? Would the ether particles have a <i style=”background-color: transparent; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; color: var(–bb-body-text-color);”>physical existence? What is their size or mass? If they’re composed of tiny particles, is there sometimes empty space between them? Or would the particles always exist right next to each other, without any gaps?

          Is the ether theory mainly theoretical, or is there experimental evidence? or even thought experiments which could illustrate some valid points?

        • Jerry

          Member
          October 21, 2023 at 10:04 pm

          Thanks, John-Erik.

          It is definitely puzzling to say the least, to consider that the gravity of objects directly affect each other, where there is (as the popular expression goes) “action at a distance”. Where they don’t seem to physically meet at all.

          With the ether though, does it get more dense (more particles at close proximity), when in the presence of objects (particularly large ones, such as stars and planets)? And does the ether (or the particles which compose it) get “sparsely scattered” in outer space? Would the ether particles have physicality? What is their size or mass? If they’re composed of tiny particles, is there sometimes empty space between them? Or would the particles always exist right next to each other, without any gaps?

          Is the ether theory mainly theoretical, or is there experimental evidence? or even thought experiments which could illustrate some valid points?

          • John-Erik

            Member
            October 21, 2023 at 11:28 pm

            Jerry

            There is no action at a distance. Ether particles must be very small, since they do not collide with each other. We cannot see their masses and sizes.

            I have answers to some of your questions in my last article “The three great problems in physics” on my profile.

            John-Erik

        • Jerry

          Member
          October 21, 2023 at 10:14 pm

          Of course, you have provided some explanations of which you seem certain. I have often questioned if gravity could somehow exist as a sort of ongoing energy field, or otherwise currently unexplainable effect that is “stacked in a three dimensional juxtiposition” that “delivers” the gravity. Though that would seem to require that gravity is in motion. So that would mean it would take time to travel to reach and affect another object, often thought at the same velocity as light. Would you say that gravity travels at all, or at least that the ether travels to bring the gravity with it?

          • John-Erik

            Member
            October 21, 2023 at 11:46 pm

            Jerry

            Gravity seems to be caused by an ether constituted by very fast particles moving in all directions with light speed. However, gravity in itself does not move at all but is emerging in side matter by effects from the ether. Gravity is a very weak force and must be cased by an extremely small difference between the flow in different directions.

            A material body in free fall is entrained by the motion of the ether that is a sum of gravity from all celestial bodies. Ether tells matter how to move. Matter also produces a component in the ether. This component is spherically symmetric.

            John_Erik